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Department of Vertebrate Zoology

Division of Amphibians & Reptiles

Phyllomedusa vaillantii
Phyllomedusa vaillantii Ecuador, Pastaza Province. Photographed by William W. Lamar
bar Andrew D. Gottscho
    Andrew D. Gottscho
    Peter Buck Postdoctoral Fellow

  • Phone: (202) 633-0741
  • Fax: (202) 633-0182
  • E-mail: GottschoA@si.edu

  • Mailing Address:
    Smithsonian Institution
    PO Box 37012, MRC 162
    Washington, DC 20013-7012

  • Shipping Address:
    Smithsonian Institution
    National Museum of Natural History
    10th & Constitution Ave NW
    Washington, DC 20560-0162

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Related Links

http://www.gottschoresearch.com

Education

B.S., Marine Biology (with Highest Honors), University of California, Santa Cruz, 2006
M.A., Biology, Humboldt State University, 2010
Ph.D., Evolutionary Biology, San Diego State University/University of California Riverside, 2015

Research Interests

My research is focused on several aspects of evolutionary biology, specifically speciation, species delimitation, phylogeography, population genomics, and bioinformatics. Most of my work involves lizards (family Phrynosomatidae) in southwestern North America. I am especially interested in applying evolutionary theory towards modern challenges in conservation biology.

Selected Publications

(all peer-reviewed except those marked with *)

*Gottscho, A. D. (2015). Recap: 2014 Colorado Desert Natural History Research Symposium. Symposium Report (November 7-9, 2014). Desert Update 81:5–6.

Leaché, A. D., A. S. Chavez, L. N. Jones, J. A. Grummer, A. D. Gottscho & C. W. Linkem (2015). Phylogenomics of phrynosomatid lizards: conflicting signals from sequence capture versus restriction site associated DNA sequencing. Genome Biology and Evolution, in press (doi: 10.1093/gbe/evv026).

Gottscho, A. D. (2015). Zoogeography of the San Andreas Fault system: Great Pacific Fracture Zones correspond with spatially concordant phylogeographic boundaries in western North America. Biological Reviews, in press (doi:10.1111/brv.12167).

Gottscho, A. D., S. Murray, H. Heinz, & J. Lemos-Espinal (2014). Crotalus angelensis: diet and predation. Herpetological Review, 45(3):514.

Gottscho, A. D. (2014). Genetic research reveals Pleistocene origin and low genetic diversity of the Mojave fringe-toed lizard (Uma scoparia). Mojave National Preserve Science Newsletter, 2014:1–5.

Gottscho, A. D., S. Marks, & W. B. Jennings (2014). Speciation, population structure, and demographic history of the Mojave Fringe-toed Lizard (Uma scoparia), a species of conservation concern. Ecology and Evolution, 4(12):2546–2562.

Vandergast, A. G., R. D. Inman, K. R. Barr, K. Nussear, T. Esque, S. A. Hathaway, D. A. Wood, P. A. Medica, J. W. Breinholt, C. L. Stephen, A. D. Gottscho, S. B. Marks, W. B. Jennings, & R. N. Fisher (2013). Evolutionary hotspots in the Mojave Desert. Diversity, 5(2):293–319.

Reilly, S., A. D. Gottscho, J. Garwood, & W. B. Jennings (2010). Phylogenetic analysis of common garter snake (Thamnophis sirtalis) stomach contents reveals cryptic range of a secretive salamander (Ensatina eschscholtzii oregonensis). Herpetological Conservation and Biology, 5(3):395–402.


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