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Department of Vertebrate Zoology

Division of Amphibians & Reptiles

Phyllomedusa vaillantii
Phyllomedusa vaillantii Ecuador, Pastaza Province. Photographed by William W. Lamar
bar Jeremy A. Feinberg
    Jeremy A. Feinberg
    James Smithson Postdoctoral Fellow

  • Phone: (202) 633-0740
  • Fax: (202) 633-0182
  • E-mail: FeinbergJ@si.edu

  • Mailing Address:
    Smithsonian Institution
    PO Box 37012, MRC 162
    Washington, DC 20013-7012

  • Shipping Address:
    Smithsonian Institution
    National Museum of Natural History
    10th & Constitution Ave NW
    Washington, DC 20560-0162

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Related Links

ResearchGate
Google Scholar
Amphibians and Reptiles of Long Island, Staten Island and Manhattan

Interviews and News Articles
The New Yorker (2015)
National Geographic (2014)
BBC News Science & Environment (2014)
NPR Weekend Edition (2014)
The New York Times (2012)
The New York Times (2006)

Education

B.A. (Biology), State University of New York at Albany, 1996 
M.S. (Biology), Hofstra University, 2000
Ph.D. (Ecology & Evolution), Rutgers University, (2015)

Research Interests

My research focuses on exploring biodiversity and examining the conservation needs and ecologies of rare species, particularly amphibians and reptiles in urban settings. Broadly, I am interested in natural history, habitat use, movement ecology, and metapopulation dynamics. My doctoral research centered on amphibian declines and led to work on cryptic species diversity and anuran bioacoustics. My current research, split between NMNH and SCBI, extends my past work on leopard frogs through broader examination of their bioacoustic and morphological features across the eastern US, and by assessing potential impacts from urban soundscapes and landscapes.

Selected Publications

Feinberg, J.A., C.E. Newman, M.D. Schlesinger, G.J. Watkins-Colwell, B. Zarate, B. Curry, H.B. Shaffer, and J. Burger.  2014.  Cryptic diversity in Metropolis: confirmation of a new leopard frog (Anura: Ranidae) from New York City and surrounding Atlantic Coast regions. PLOS One 9 (10), e0108213.

Burger, J., J. Feinberg, C. Jeitner, M. Gochfeld, M. Donio, and T. Pittfield.  2014.  Selenium:mercury molar ratios in bullfrog and leopard frog tadpoles from the Northeastern United States. EcoHealth 11(2): 154-163.

Burger, J., M. Gochfeld, C.W. Powers, L. Niles, R.T. Zappalorti, J. Feinberg, and J. Clarke.  2013.  Habitat protection for sensitive species: Balancing species requirements, human constraints using bioindicators as examples. Natural Science 5(2013): 50-62.

Newman, C.E., J.A. Feinberg, L.J. Rissler, J. Burger, and H.B. Shaffer.  2012.  A new species of leopard frog (Anura: Ranidae) from the urban northeastern US.  Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 63: 445-455.

Goodyear, S.E. and J.A. Feinberg.  2006.  Heterodon platirhinos (Eastern Hognose Snake).  Envenomation and Prey Survival.  Natural History Note.  Herpetological Review.  37 (3): 352-353.

Calle, P.P., J.A. Feinberg, T.M. Green, R.P. Moore, K.M. Smith, E. Baitchman and B.L. Raphael.  2005.  Long Island, New York, hognose snake (Heterodon platirhinos) biotelemetry.  In C.K. Baer (ed.), 2005 Proceedings of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians, American Association of Wildlife Veterinarians, and the American Zoo and Aquarium Association Nutrition Advisory Group.  Omaha, NE.  American Association of Zoo Veterinarians.  pp. 205-207.

Feinberg, J.A. and R.L. Burke.  2003.  Nesting ecology and predation of diamondback terrapins, Malaclemys terrapin, at Gateway National Recreation Area, New York.  Journal of Herpetology 37(3): 517-526.



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